Course Descriptions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ENGLISH AND MODERN LANGUAGES


Arabic • Chinese • DMST • English • French • Hindi • Japanese • Portuguese • Spanish •  Swahili • Theater


ARABIC

ARAB 101 Fundamentals of Arabic I
This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar, and translation. Laboratory work is required.

ARAB 102 Fundamentals of Arabic II
Fundamentals of Arabic II is a continuation of ARAB 101. This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar, and translation. Laboratory work is required. Prerequisite: ARAB 101.

CHINESE

CHIN 101 Beginning Chinese
An introduction to speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese, this course emphasizes the mastery of pronunciation and basic characters. This course also uses discussions and authentic materials to develop the student’s understanding of Chinese culture.

CHIN  102 – Intermediate Chinese
A continuation of speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese, this course emphasizes the mastery of pronunciation and basic characters.  This course also uses discussions and authentic materials to develop the student’s understanding of Chinese culture. Prerequisites:  CHIN 101.

DMST – Digital Media Studies

DMST  200 – Media In Today’s Society
This course examines the effects of digital media and mass communication on American culture. Students will examine communication theories, historical and contemporary research, the mass media industries. laws and regulations. and the effects of media on society. It is a prerequisite for many digital media courses.
Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better.

DMST  210 – Writing For Public Communication
This interactive course will stress the communication fundamentals of clarity. concision, and cohesion. Students will learn to target their market, sharpen their message, and structure and shape their communication for maximum impact. While refreshing their knowledge of mechanics (grammar, punctuation), students will progress through a series of assignments, both individual and group, that they can tailor toward a focus on multiplatform communication for various professions-including public relations, marketing, journalism, and other careers in strategic communication.  Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and 102 w/ C or better.

DMST  220 – Introduction To Computer Graphics
This class is an introductory level course in commercial ,,computer ,generated graphic design, illustration, desktop publication, and web design, Through a “hands-on” studio approach, the student will develop a basic knowledge of the various application programs of desktop publication and illustration using the Macintosh computers located in the Graphics Lab. Prerequisite: DMST 200 or permission of instructor.

DMST  230 – Elements Of Cinema
In this course. you will gain a broad textual, technical and cultural understanding of American cinema. We will watch and analyze full movies and movie clips, read comprehensive introductory texts, and view video tutorials about techniques of filmmaking. Broadly speaking, the course will be segmented into the three areas of film study: the textual elements of cinema (e.g. narrative, characterization, plot, etc.); the technical elements of cinema {e.g. mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, etc.); and the cultural elements of cinema (e.g. representations of race, class. and gender). Through readings, screenings, video posts, two essays, and a final project you will develop a vocabulary and analytical skills that will allow you to discuss a film within these three contexts.
Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better

DMST 240 – Essentials of Interviewing
This course is a study of methods used to prepare for and conduct interviews for articles in print, broadcast, cable and online media.  Emphasis is placed on ways to structure a set of questions to elicit information and conduct an effective interview.
Prerequisite: DMST 210

DMST 250 – Principles of Public Relations
Professional communicators must be armed with the appropriate skills to respond at a moment’s notice.  The pace of the 24 hour news cycle and speed at which news travels in the 21st century mandates PR professionals are able to assess and react quickly. Course will cover the history and development of the field of PR as a profession; strategic management; research; professionalism and ethical issues; communication theories; strategies and tactics; global trends and discussions on the future of the profession.
Prerequisite: DMST 210

DMST 300 – Understanding Audio
The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of audio production equipment, a familiarity with broadcast radio, and an awareness of the importance of audio in other media.  Goals will be achieved through the classroom lecture, and the creation of various types of audio production.
Prerequisite: DMST 200

DMST 310 – Fundamentals of Studio Production
Basic techniques of television studio production, including producing, writing, directing and electronic graphics production.
Prerequisites: DMST 220 & DMST 300

DMST 320 – Fundamentals of Field Production
This course will introduce students to the techniques and technology of single camera electronic new gathering and electronic field production.  Covering everything from creative and technical recording and editing techniques to copyright issues. Prerequisite: DMST 310

DMST 330 – Communications Ethics
This course is designed to provide an overview of theoretical approached to ethical dilemmas.  Foundation ethical theory will be explored and used to analyze, discuss and evaluate modern ethical dilemmas presented in the form of case studies.  Through analyzing these historic and cultural examples, students will build a foundational ethical framework for making decisions and recommendations in the workplace. Prerequisite: DMST 200

DMST 340 – Social Media Communication
This course will explore the rise, and growth of social media as a 21st century communication practice.  Students will study the advances that led to the creation of social media and, just as importantly, examine how the use of social media fed its growth.  Students will develop social media communication plans and practice digital  communication skills using online tools such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, and Tumblr
Prerequisites: DMST 200& 210

DMST 350 – Journalism
This a writing-intensive course designed to introduce students to the process of gathering news for broadcast and print publication.  Specific attention will be paid to the differences between the two styles of writing.
Prerequsites: DMST 210

DMST 360 – Issues in Global Media
In this course, students take an interdisciplinary and critical approach to this growing field, understanding how creativity, media and communication are produced and consumed, seeing how they are implicated in political and social change, and how media business are shaping our world.
Students will learn several theoretical approaches to global media and communications in order develop an ability to critically analyze complex media practices (images, narratives, product messages, industries), and the relevant skills to interpret and develop media messages across cultures, nations, and markets.
Prerequisite: DMST 200

DMST 370 – Documentary Production
This class in an examination of documentary film/video production.  Through a “hands-on” studio approach, the student will develop knowledge of documentary film/video and the use of video/audio equipment as well as the use of editing software.
Prerequisites: DMST 210 & DMST 320

DMST 380 – Designing Digital Communication
This class is an introduction to commercial computer generated design applicable to traditional print media and digital interactive web layout and design.  Through a “hands-on” studio approach, the student will develop further knowledge of the various application programs using the Macintosh computers located in the Graphics lab.
Prerequisite: DMST 220

DMST 390 – Digital Story Telling
This course explores the production of news for multimedia,  Students will learn to create relevant content for a target audience by building proficiencies in story conception, interviewing, videography, writing, use of graphics and interactive elements, and non-linear editing.  Through effective teamwork, students will create multiple projects utilizing skills and equipment designed to prepare them for employment in multimedia journalism and-or public relations.
Prerequisites: DMST 320 & DMST 350

DMST 400 – Cultural Criticism
This course is designed to introduce college students to looking at elements of culture through a critical lens. Students will evaluate news media, cycled stories, and ideology as presented thorough media venues and how they are disseminated and perceived by the culture at large.  This course will also explore how to analyze, write, and critique the issues examined by producing op-ed pieces and critical commentary.  Students will examine a variety of techniques and strategies to enhance their writing and critical thinking skills.
Prerequisite: DMST 210

DMST 410 – Digital Animation
This class is an introduction to commercial computer generated animation.  Through a “hands-on” studio approach, the student will develop a basic knowledge of the various application programs used to create digital animation.
Prerequisite: DMST 220

DMST 420 – Media Law
This course is designed to introduce students to the numerous legal issues presented in media careers.  It includes a broad understanding of libel, copyright, advertising regulation and First Amendment protections across traditional and emerging media platforms. Through this introduction, students will be introduced to legal reasoning and analysis.  They will also become familiar with the regulatory process of the Federal Communications Commission.
Prerequisite: DMST 330

DMST 430 – Special Topics in Cinema
Special Topics in Cinema is an in-depth examination of some particular aspect of film and film-making.  In any given semester, the course may concentrate on, but by no means be limited to, such diverse topics as film genre, the work of a particular director or auteur, or literature to film adaptations.
Prerequisite: DMST 230

DMST 440 – African American Cinema
The goal of this course is to critically examine the history, culture, politics, concepts and issues related to African American film experience. While focusing on representations of African American life, culture and politics as reflected in mainstream and independent cinema, we will review the manner in which African Americans have participated in the film experience including, but not limited to, the process of writing, directing, acting, producing, critiquing, and, as audience members, consuming. Students will be introduced to several theories of film and race as we study the construction and meaning of African American cinema from the past and present, and the political significance of African American images in popular culture. 
Prerequisites: DMST 230

DMST 450 – Screenwriting
This course is an introduction to an overview of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema.  Emphasis is placed on telling a story in terms of action and the reality of characters.  The difference between the literary and visual medium is explored through individual writing projects and group analysis.  Development of synopsis, treatment and drafts for a short theatrical screenplay: theme, plot, character, mise-en-scene and utilization of cinematic elements.  Through a series of lectures and discussions students will be introduced to the formal art of screenwriting.  They will apply their knowledge in the crafting of a short screenplay that will be workshopped over the course of the term.
Prerequisites: ENGL 207 & ENGL 324

DMST 460 – Student Media Practicum
This course provides hands-on experience to students who seek to practice their classroom media skills in a variety of applications including, but not limited to, managing campus media organizations, assisting University publications, and/or serving as a video crew to the department’s production coordinator.  This is a one credit course which may be repeated for a total not exceed four credits.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7

DMST 472 – Internship
This course is designed to provide experimental learning for students who seek careers in media related fields.  It offers a unique opportunity to gather onsite career-related experience and apply information previously gathered in a classroom setting.  Credit is awarded in three credit increments (3, 6, 9, or 12) and may be repeated for a total of twelve credits.
Instructor permission, successful completion of 56 prior credit hours, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7

DMST 490 – Senior Capstone
This course requires students to use their digital media skills in practical real-world applications in preparation for employment.  Prerequisite: open only to Digital Media studies majors who have reached senior status.

DMST 499 – Independent Research
This course is designed to allow digital medias students to explore a research topic of their own choosing.  Students will create their own research proposal, an annotated bibliography, and a presentation based on their findings.  Students will examine a variety of techniques and strategies to enhance their writing, critical thinking, and presentation skills.  Prerequisites: permission of instructor

ENGLISH

ENGL 100 First Year Experience Credit 1
This course is to provide an opportunity for students to make a seamless transition from high school to college. Essential skills for transition will be explored and discussed. This course will assist students in developing cognitive skills and will assist them in adjusting personally and socially to the college environment. This course will enable first-year students to develop creative and critical thinking skills, and information literacy skills needed to facilitate a successful transition from high school to university. Additionally, this course shall facilitate self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills. In addition to providing information needed for student success at the University, this course serves as a conduit for students entering the field of English and Telecommunications. Students will be provided with the prerequisites needed to make a successful transition into the English Non-Teaching Major. The course will develop interpersonal and conflict resolution skills providing academic, personal, social, and emotional adjustments.

ENGL 101 Basic Composition I Credit 3
This course is designed to review the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and conventional usage, and to provide skills of organization and development in writing. Adequate opportunity for written analysis and oral discussion of selected examples of prose and creative writing are provided to encourage an interest in literature and the development of a critical attitude toward literature in general. A research paper will be required.

ENGL 101 Honors English Composition I Honors Credit 3
The major goal of this course is to develop proficiency in expository writing, particularly the communication of ideas in clear, precise language that demonstrates advanced knowledge of organization, grammar, and usage. This course satisfies the “Statement of Expectations” for freshman writing.

ENGL 102 Basic Composition II Credit 3
his course continues the study of basic elements of written composition, especially organization and development. Central to the course is the examination of selections from prose, poetry and drama. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ENGL 102 Honors English Composition II Honors Credit 3
This course is a continuation of ENGL 101H. The course will review modes of expository writing with emphasis on the research paper. The major goal is to develop proficiency in critical writing.

ENGL 203 Fundamentals of Contemporary Speech Credit 3
This course requires the preparation and delivery of short original speeches, outside readings and reports. It is recommended that this course be taken during the sophomore year. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 204 Introduction to Fiction Credit 3
This course is an introduction to the development of fiction with concentration on several major fiction writers. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 205 Introduction to Drama Credit 3
This course is an introduction to drama around the world through reading, analyzing, viewing, and performance. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 206 Introduction to Poetry Credit 3
This course is an introduction to the development of poetry with concentration on several major poets. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 207 Introduction to Creative Writing Credit 3
This course provides an introduction to various techniques used by successful writers of all genres with the object of assisting students in developing and improving their technique. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 215 Introduction to Film Credit 3
This course involves a study of the motion picture as an art form and as an influence on society. Basic concepts of organization, structure, and techniques of editing are examined through the reading of selected material and the viewing of a number of short films and excerpts from feature films. The course moves from the basic psychology of visual perception through the history, theory, and critical standards of film. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102

ENGL 218 Approaches to Grammar Credit 3
This course provides a comprehensive review of traditional English grammar and is designed particularly for prospective teachers and writers. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 219 American Literature I Credit 3
This course is a survey of the major American authors and their works from the beginning of American civilization to Walt Whitman. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 220 American Literature II Credit 3
This course is a survey of the major American authors and their works from Walt Whitman to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 223 Theater Practicum Credit 1
This course is an opportunity for acting and technical experience through Participation Theater performed in front of a live audience. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

ENGL 224 English Literature I Credit 3
This course involves a survey of selected authors and works in English Literature from the beginning through the 18th Century. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 226 African American Literature Credit 3
This course provides a survey of Black American Literature encompassing both oral tradition and written literature. Attention is given to the genres of poetry, drama, slave narrative, novel, and essay. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 227 World Literature I Credit 3
This course is an introductory study of major movements and genres in Eastern, Western, and African Literatures from ancient times through the Western Renaissance, with the objective of helping students to gain knowledge of the culture of people other than American. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 305 Technical Writing/Honors/Online Credit 3
Honors/Online/Hybrid
This course teaches how to plan, write, and design a variety of professional workplace documents, such as emails, memos, letters, and résumés, as well as writing to clarify statistics, writing to support graphics, and writing to explain instructions.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 001 (EPE), ENGL 101, ENGL 102, ENGL 203, and 56+ credits (Junior status).

ENGL 310 Advanced Composition/Honors/Online Credit 3
This course involves a study of prose techniques such as definition, classification, analysis, and process analysis. It includes the reading of model documents (essays, news stories, etc.) and a substantial amount of practice of expository writing. The course is open to all students who have successfully completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 311 Argumentation and Persuasion Credit 3
This course is designed to reflect and refine current theory and practice in argumentation and debate. Students develop conceptual apparatus to apply general principles as required by circumstances. The course blends theoretical explanation and practical advice. Students must master the basic terms and theories common to all argumentation which are necessary as a prelude to the more specific study in academic debate. Subsequently, the ultimate purpose of the course is to help students learn to become effective advocates. Prerequisite: ENGL 203

ENGL 312 Group Discussion Credit 3
Group discussion provides students with the knowledge and practical experience necessary to enable them to work with discussion groups as active and productive participants. The students will be knowledgeable of the theoretical grounding and participate in a variety of roles as a discussion-group participant. Because the course is designed with student-oriented activities as an integral part of the structure, active class participation is mandatory. Prerequisite: ENGL 203

ENGL 317 Shakespeare Credit 3
This course examines characteristics and qualities of selected works of Shakespeare. Emphasis is generally placed on the more significant tragedies, comedies and histories within the context of the Elizabethan world view. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 322 English Literature II Credit 3
This course is a continuation of ENGL 321 dealing with English Literature since the Restoration. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 324 Literature and Film Credit 3
This course examines the relationship between literature and film, with particular emphasis on the problems and procedures inherent in the transition of novels and short narratives into screenplays. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 325 Literary Criticism Credit 3
This course entails the study of various critical approaches to literature, such as textual, archetypal, psychological, and sociological. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 329 World Literature II Credit 3
This course is a continuation of English 328. It deals with World Literature since the Western Renaissance. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 330 Advanced Public Speaking Credit 3
This course involves a study of rhetorical principles and models of speech composition in conjunction with the preparation and presentation of specific forms of public address. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102, and ENGL 203.

ENGL 332 The African Writer Credit 3
This course focuses on contemporary African Literature, with special emphasis on the role of the writer. The course includes many of the major African literary works (fiction, poetry, and drama) of the last sixty years. The course also focuses on the African writer’s unique role as creator of functional art. Prerequisite: ENGL 327H.

ENGL 345 Special Topics in Literature Credit 3
Structured around rotating topics, this course involves an intensive study of the literary works of various authors. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102 and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 346 History of the English Language Credit 3
This course covers major developments in the history of English to the modern period with consideration of important changes and principles of development in phonology, syntax, and semantics. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 347 Adolescent and Adult Literature Credit 3
An eclectic survey of fiction and other forms of literature written primarily for adolescents (ages 10 through 14) and young adults (ages 15-18), the course explores and examines themes and ideas in literature relevant to the period prior to adulthood, utilizing the principles of contemporary literary criticism. The course is intended for English Education majors but is open to all students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisites: successful completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 351 Communications Design Survey Credit 3
This course is an introduction to the study of visual communications. It involves conceptualization, graphic imagery, aesthetics, and symbolism for the communication of information through graphic design, with specific emphasis on the relationship of graphic design to advertising. Problem-solving projects related to the design profession are required. Prerequisites: TELC 336 and TELC 337.

ENGL 380 Introduction to Language Science Credit 3
This course provides an introductory survey of contemporary linguistics with special focus on present-day American English. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 401 Modern Drama Credit 3
This course is designed to give an overview and understanding of Modern Drama from Ibsen to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 AND ENGL 102.

ENGL 404 Studies in Drama Credit 3
This course allows opportunities for a variety of topics pertinent to drama. An analysis of drama from around the world through reading, viewing, performance, and various forms of artistic expression will be explored. The course also concentrates on specific social and political events that foster the various types of drama produced during a particular period. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102 and ENGL 205.

ENGL 405 Studies in Film Credit 3
This course provides an in-depth examination of some particular aspect of film. In any given semester the course may concentrate on, but by no means be limited to, such diverse topics as American film genre, the work of a particular film director, or literature-to-film transition. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102 and ENGL 215.

ENGL 408 Studies in Poetry Credit 3
This course traces the development of poetry with concentration on several major poets. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102, and ENGL 206.

ENGL 412 Commonwealth Literature Credit 3
This course involves intensive study of the works of writers from Commonwealth countries. Attention is paid to the evolution of the author’s canon, the effects on the literary context, the relationship between the literary works and the historical and cultural context of the writer. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 413 The Novel – East and West/Online Credit 3
This is a multicultural course that examines novels as a global form that speaks for the aspirations of the modern middle class individual and criticizes social abuses. Comparison of novels from America, Africa, Europe, and Asia are made. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.

ENGL 472 Internship Credits 3-12This course is an internship in various study areas arranged by and with permission of the instructor. Students wishing to travel abroad may petition for Foreign Language credit under this course. Contact the Department Chair for details. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102 & permission of the instructor.

ENGL 490 Senior Capstone in English and Modern Languages Credit 3
The Senior Capstone Course in English and Modern Languages is designed for seniors who will demonstrate their competence as English majors by preparing and presenting a portfolio of their best works, suitable for assessment by a three-panel faculty jury. The portfolio should include a cover letter, résumé, personal statement, a foreign language writing sample, in addition to four significantly revised and polished essays from four different English courses across the student’s collegiate career. Students are also required to give a brief oral presentation in a foreign language and a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation of the final portfolio at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisite: Senior English majors only.

ENGL 499 Independent Research in English Credit 1-3
This course provides a vehicle to enable the student to range academically as far as interests and preparation carry him on a topic agreed upon by the instructor and student in the area of English and Modern Languages. The student is required to meet and confer with the instructor on specified conference dates. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

FRENCH

FREN 101 Fundamentals of French I Credit 3
This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar, and translation. Laboratory work is required. It is recommended that students who have two or more years of high school French take an examination for credit.

FREN 102 Fundamentals in French II Credit 3
This course is a continuation of French 101. This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar and translation. Laboratory work is required. It is recommended that students who have two or more years of high school French take an examination for credit. Prerequisite: C or better in FREN101

FREN 201 Intermediate French I Credit 3
This course involves a review of grammar and pronunciation and involves graded readings of modern prose. Prerequisite: C or better in FREN 101and FREN 102 or the equivalent.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II Credit 3
This course provides a review of idiomatic expressions, applications of language skills to reading, composition, and class discussion. Prerequisite: C or better in FREN 201 or equivalent.

FREN 301 Conversation and Composition Credit 3
This course focuses on the development of conversational proficiency in French, development of writing skills through written reports on current events and focuses on literary topics. Prerequisites: C or better in FREN 101, 102, 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 302 Translation Credit 3
This course is designed to develop advanced skills through training in translation and interpretation. Students translate French texts from different fields with emphasis on grammar and literary quality. They also practice translation from English into French. Prerequisites: C or better FREN 101, 102, 201 and 202, or permission of instructor.

FREN 401 French for the Business World Credit 3
This course is an introduction to the study of terminology used in business, and styles used in commercial, private and official formats for correspondence and various common business documents. Prerequisites: C or better in FREN 302 or permission of the Instructor

FREN 402 Writers of French-Speaking Africa and the Caribbean Credit 3
This course involves the study of selected novels expressing the culture and the aspirations of the French speaking people of Africa and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: C or better in FREN 301 and FREN 302 or permission of the Instructor.

HINDI

HIND  101 – Fundamentals of Hindi I
The main objective for this course is to enable students to develop usable proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing Hindi, while also having knowledge of formal grammar. The course is designed in such a way as to enable students to develop their abilities to learn the language and communicate in Hindi.

HIND  102 – Fundamentals of Hindi II
he main objective for this course is to continue to enable students to develop usable proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing Hindi, while also having knowledge of formal grammar. The course is designed in such a way as to enable students to develop their abilities to learn the language and communicate in Hindi. Prerequisite(s): HIND 101  with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

JAPANESE

JAPN  101 – Introduction to Japanese 101
This course will offer opportunities to develop proficiency in modern Japanese at the elementary level.  Our emphasis is on linguistic competency in four components: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Further, students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the target culture.  This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through practice in pronunciation, grammar and the translation of elementary prose.  This course is designed for those who have no prior knowledge of the Japanese language.

JAPN  102 – Introduction to Japanese II
This course will be a continuation of JAPN 101 and covers both spoken and written coverage of basic Japanese.  Students will engage in regular and independent practice at the Foreign Language Instructional Center.  Prerequisite: JAPN 101.

JAPN   201 – Intermediate Japanese I
This course provides for the acquisition and continuation of basic skills in the language through practice in pronunciation, grammar, and the translation of intermediate level prose. Laboratory work is required (this can be accomplished online from your computer).  Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Japanese 101 and 102 or with a grade of C or better.

JAPN   202 – Intermediate Japanese II
This course will offer opportunities to develop proficiency in modern Japanese at the intermediate level.  Our emphasis is on linguistic competency in four components: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Further, students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the target culture. This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through practice in pronunciation, grammar, and the translation of intermediate level prose.  This course is designed for those who have completed the first year of Japanese language. Prerequisite(s): JAPN 101, JAPN 102, and JAPN 201 with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

JAPN   301 – Advanced Japanese I
The main objective for this course is to enable students to develop advanced level proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing Japanese, while also having knowledge of the various speech levels in Japanese such as honorific and humble. The course is designed in such a way as to enable students to develop their abilities and gain advanced level language skills and communicate in Japanese. Prerequisites: JAPN 101, 102, 201, 202 with a grade of ‘C’ or better..

JAPN   302 – Advanced Japanese II
The main objective for this course is to enable students to develop advanced level proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing Japanese, while also having knowledge of the various speech levels in Japanese such as honorific and humble. The course is designed in such a way as to enable students to develop their abilities and gain advanced level language skills and communicate in Japanese. Prerequisites: JAPN 101, 102, 201, 202, and 301 with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

PORTUGUESE

PORT  101 – Fundamentals of Portuguese I
This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar, and translation of elementary prose. This course also uses discussions and authentic materials to develop the student’s understanding of the culture.

PORT  102 – Fundamentals of Portuguese II
This course continues the development of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar, and translation of elementary prose. This course also uses discussions and authentic materials to develop the student’s understanding of the culture. Prerequisite: PORT 101 with grade of ‘C’ or better.

SPANISH

SPAN 101 Fundamentals of Spanish I Credit 3
This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar, and translation of elementary prose. Laboratory work is required. To receive credit for this course, the student must also complete SPAN 102. It is recommended that students who have two or more years of high school Spanish take an examination for credit.

SPAN 102 Fundamentals of Spanish II Credit 3
This course provides for the acquisition of basic skills in the language through drills in pronunciation, grammar and translation. Lab work is required. To receive credit for this course, the student must also complete SPAN 101. It is recommended that students who have two or more years of high school Spanish take an examination for credit. Prerequisite: C or better in SPAN101.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I Credit 3
This course provides a review of grammar and pronunciation. The course involves graded readings of modern prose. Prerequisites: C or better in SPAN 101 and SPAN 102 or equivalent.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II Credit 3
This course is a review of idiomatic expressions, and applications of language skills to reading, composition, and class discussion. Prerequisites: C or better in SPAN 101, SPAN 102 and SPAN 201.

SPAN 301 Spanish Conversation and Composition Credit 3
This course is designed for the development of conversational proficiency in Spanish. It further focuses on the development of writing skills through reports on current events and on literary topics. Prerequisites: C or better in SPAN 101, 102, 201 and 202, or permission of the Instructor.

SPAN 302 Translation/Online Credit 3
This course is designed to develop advanced skills through training in translation and interpretation. Students translate Spanish texts from different fields with emphasis on grammar and literary quality. They also practice translation from English into Spanish. Prerequisites: C or better in SPAN 101, 102, 201 and 202, or permission of the Instructor.

SPAN 401 Spanish for the Business World Credit 3
This course is an introduction to the study of terminology used in business, and styles used in commercial, private and official formats for correspondence and various common business documents. Prerequisites: C or better in SPAN 302 or permission of the Instructor.

SPAN 402 Writers of Spanish Expression-Spain/Latin America Credit 3
This course is a study of selected novels expressing the culture and aspirations of the Spanish-speaking people of Spain and Latin America. Prerequisites: C or better in SPAN 302 or permission of the Instructor.

SWAHILI

SWAH  101 – Fundamentals of Swahili I
This course introduces students to the history, cultures, and languages of Swahili people. Students will have the opportunity to become familiar with East African and Indian Ocean geography.  Students can begin to understand the human interaction around the Indian Ocean.  Students will have opportunities to have fun learning to speak, read, write, and understand some Swahili language.

SWAH  102 – Fundamentals of Swahili II
This course introduces students to the history, cultures, and languages of Swahili people. Students will have the opportunity to become familiar with East African and Indian Ocean geography.  Students can begin to understand the human interaction around the Indian Ocean.  Students will have opportunities to have fun learning to speak, read, write, and understand some Swahili language.

THEATER ARTS

THAR 101 Intro To Theater Credits 3
The course presents a survey of theater through the exploration of the components of a production, acting, set, costumes, lighting, sound, script, and the audience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

THAR 102 Stagecraft Credit 3
This course involves an investigation and application of the visual effects of stage scenery in dramatic productions with exercises in set designing. Practical experiences within current productions are offered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THAR 201 History of Theater and Drama Credit 3
This course provides a study of the cultural forms of theater from the Greek period to the end of the Renaissance, with analysis of selected plays. Selected plays from all major periods are read and critically analyzed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THAR 202 History of Theater and Drama II Credit 3
The course offers a study of the cultural forms of theater from the end of Renaissance to the present, with analysis of selected plays. Selected plays from all major periods are read and critically analyzed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THAR 203 Acting I Credit 3
This course provides a survey of acting practices along with basic training in the elements of acting, with preliminary studies in movement, pantomime, interpretation, and the use of the voice. Students participate in scenes or plays. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THAR 204 Acting II Credit 3
This course is a continuation of Acting I with more advanced instruction in movement, interpretation, and voice usage. Acting technique is stressed. Students participate in selected plays. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

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